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BIG BIG BIG NONLINEAR INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN SECRET NONLINEAR DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN OVERVIEW.

ONE NONLINEAR ASSIGNMENT WILL CHANGE INSTRUCTION AND LEARNING.

ASK THE PROFESSOR A QUESTION NONLINEAR DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN.

NONLINEAR CREATIVE DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN TRIAD.

NONLINEAR DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN.

NONLINEAR DICTIONARY INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN.

NONLINEAR DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AWARDS.

NONLINEAR DIGITAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN REAL LIFE LEARNING.


NONLINEAR DIGITAL LEARNING FINAL PAPERS JOB AIDS.

NONLINEAR INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN INDIVIDUALIZED TESTING.

NONLINEAR INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN CASE STORIES.  
REAL CASE STORYJAMES L FISHER LTD REPORT ASSESSMENT.

TEXTBOOK TRIAD OF IMPORTANT INFORMATION.


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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS TO AND FROM THE FIELD OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN.


TEXTBOOKS THE MOST INSIDIOUS,
 DECEPTIVE, AND EXPLOITIVE FORM OF
INSTRUCTION.

TEXTBOOKS
DISCOURSE ON METHOD.

IMPOSSIBLE TEST BANK QUESTIONS.

Textbooks are Linear Destroyers.
For Every Second You Spend on
This Page You Will Be Changed
as a Teacher

 

Photo of Dr. David Morris

Textbooks are one of the least valued most expensive products in our society. I have hundreds of issues that should be explored. Just look at your textbooks? Mass marketing textbooks are implausible, improbable, inadequate, inconceivable, insufficient, questionable, scant, scattered, shallow, sketchy, skimpy, superficial, unconvincing, corrupt, debased, doctored, boring, conventional, feeble, flat, halfhearted, humdrum, insipid, lifeless, monotonous, routine, spiritless, tedious, unexciting, uninspiring, uninteresting, weak, wearisome, and contaminated. Their story is to deceive the reader.

CONTENT I
TEXTBOOKS THE MOST INSIDIOUS, DECEPTIVE, AND EXPLOITIVE
FORM OF INSTRUCTION

   

Agricultural Marketing

Competiting Definition of Terms

Form, Force, and Power


Government Marketing

Internet Marketing

Market Power

Marketing and American History

Marketing and Auto Industry

Marketing and Campus Bookstores

Marketing and Climate, Geography, Global Warming, Position on Earth

Marketing and Consumer Ideology

Marketing and Cosmology

Marketing and Culture

Marketing and Financial Resources

Marketing and Human Resources

Marketing and Instructional Design

Marketing and International

Marketing and Military

Marketing and Myths

Marketing and Nature

Marketing and New Product Development

Marketing and Perception of Value

Marketing and Philosophy

Marketing and Physical Resources

Marketing and Poetry

Marketing and Pollution

Marketing and Public Relations

Marketing and Regulation

Marketing and Religion

Marketing and Research

Marketing and Retail

Marketing and Satire

Marketing and Science

Marketing and Small Business

Marketing and Social Status

Marketing and Storytelling

 

 




Marketing and the Law

Marketing and Teens

Marketing and Textbook Creation

Marketing and Textbook Costs

Marketing and Theory W

Marketing and Transnational Corporations

Marketing and War

Marketing and World History

Marketing and Why

Marketing and Why Not

Marketing Ethics

Marketing and Education

Marketing Intangible Resources

Marketing Issues that are Avoided in Textbooks

Marketing Textbook Oligopoly

Marketing to Children

Marketing and the Ethnic

My Thoughts

Partial List of Questions Why Content and Process Poorly Included in the Mass Marketing Textbooks One to Seven

Textbook Company Marketing

Textbook Dependent Business Schools

Textbook Dependent Marketing Author

Textbook Dependent Marketing Departments

Textbook Dependent Marketing Professors

Textbook Dependent Professors

Textbook Dependent Scholarly and Professional Organizations

Textbook Dependent Students

Textbook Dependent Universities

What May be Considered?

Why is This Happening?

 

 


WHY ARE THE FOLLOWING AREAS OMITTED AND DOWN PLAYED IN MARKETING TEXTBOOKS? MARKETING TEXTBOOKS HAVE BEEN SO LIMITED IN THEIR CONTENT THAT STUDENTS MAY ACTUALLY BE DEPRIVED OF AN EDUCATION. AS PROFESSORS I BELIEVE WE ALL HAVE TO KEEP QUITE OR BE PUNISHED BY TOP ADMINISTRATION AND COLLEAGUE QUISLINGS. FOR FIRMS TO MISREPRESENT AND FORCE GOOD PEOPLE TO SELL INFERIOR PRODUCTS FOR FINANCIAL GAINS IS NOTHING NEW. THIS IS A NATIONAL SCANDAL WAITING TO BE IDENTIFIED.

Agricultural Marketing

Why are discussions of pesticides, radiated foods, and genetically engineered crops avoided in marketing textbooks?

Competing Definition of Terms

Where is a definition of principles of marketing?
Have there ever been any identified principles of marketing derived from empirical research?
Why are there only single definitions of marketing terms when may terms have multiple meanings?
Why are the applications and definition of marketing activities applied by different fields not identified in textbooks?
What is the difference between place and distribution in marketing textbooks?
What is the difference between goals and objectives in marketing textbooks?
Why is process changed in a major marketing textbook 75 times?
Why are the definitions of process terms changed in the textbook?
What is the impact of word selection on the success of marketing?

Form, Force, and Power

My secret, but I will be happy to share when you are ready.

Government Marketing

How do trademark, patent, and laws give a company market power?
What is the governments role in the creation of holidays and marketing?
What is the governments role in the creation of long weekends and marketing?
Why does government change the dates of holidays?
How have the tax codes increasing the sales of products and services?
How do political views influence and change marketing practice?
What is the role of the government and military in the development and marketing of successful products and services?
What is the government and militaries role in successful new product development?
What is the relationship between political support of industries and their contributions to political campaigns?
How has government regulatory practices influenced the change in textbook company ownership?
What was the US Governments role in the model cities program and the impact of this program on marketing within cities?
What was the US Governments role in the development and expansion of the single family home during the depression?

Internet Marketing

Why is the internet continually down graded in marketing textbooks as a form of learning marketing?

Market Power

What is the relationship between corporate wealth and the success of product implementation?
What are some uses and abuses of market power in marketing?

Marketing and American History

Where are the historic links to current marketing information and practice in marketing textbooks?
Where are the historic chronologies of events leading to any current marketing theory or practice?

Marketing and Auto Industry

Why was the calendar changed for the new model year in the auto industry?
Why are the excessive costs of luxury automobiles never challenged in marketing textbooks?

Marketing and Campus Bookstores

What is the revenue generated by campus bookstores per square foot compared with comparable book stories serving other book markets?
Do campus bookstores receive yearly bonuses from textbook publishers?
Why do campus bookstores buy and sell textbooks from students?
Why are campus bookstores bundling marketing textbooks?
Why do campus bookstores often refuse to share ISBN numbers of textbooks with students?
Do university finance officers receive updates on the number of textbooks sold in their leased campus bookstores?
How many campus bookstores are run by outside companies in the USA?
How many different bookstore companies in the college bookstore market?
How are campus bookstores marketing their textbooks to students?
What is the role of the university in the marketing of campus
bookstore textbooks?
Are campus bookstores following the AMA ethical guidelines?

Marketing and Climate, Geography, Global Warming, Position on Earth
(Back to TOP)

What are the links between climate and marketing?
What are the links between geography and marketing?
What are the links between global warming and marketing?
What are the links between the position of the sun and marketing
What are the links between the spread of the flu and marketing?
Why do we still use the Mercator map devised in 1569 in Germany that distorts the land masses in the world in favor of the Northern hemisphere in marketing?
How has the geography of Connecticut influenced marketing?
What is the relationship between consumption and the collapse of major civilizations?
What are the links between natural disasters and marketing?
What are the links between the melting of the polar ice cap and marketing?

Marketing and Consumer Ideology

What are the impact of companies like Disney and McDonalds and the spread of consumer ideology throughout the world?

Marketing and Cosmology

Where are cosmologies and their influence on cultural drives, thoughts, actions, and consumption discussed in marketing textbooks?

Marketing and Culture

What is the impact of consumer marketing on the destruction of other cultural forms?
What is the impact of meaning systems and marketing?
Why does the consumer movement change the meaning of cultural stories?
What is the impact of groups like the Amish on marketing?

Marketing and Education

What is the relationship between marketing and bullying in high school?
What is the impact of marketing products in K-12 classrooms?
What is the impact and economic benefits returned to a K-12 school system for exposure of their students to marketing messages in school?
What is the actual use of advertising in free educational television K-12 within schools?
What is the role of marketing contracts to K-12 school systems that sell food and drinks?
What are the relationships between textbook design and research on learning?

Marketing and Ethics
(Back to TOP)

What are the ethical consequences of marketing that focuses on greater consumption?
What is the impact of free trade on marketing?

Marketing and the Ethnic

Why is there no mention of the influence on marketing of the Irish in America?
Why is a rising tide of leadership accusing marketing of being a destructive force that is used to keep groups from access to wealth and success?

Marketing and Financial Resources

What is the relationship between the cost of money and success in marketing?
What is the role of marketing and excessive credit card interest rates, fees, and penalties?

Marketing and Human Resources

What is the impact of selection, training, and up grading of employees and the marketing of a firms products and services?
What is the impact of employees that have just taken the introductory course in marketing at a university and their ability to assist in decision making?
What is the impact of private consulting firms and corporate perceptions and actions in marketing?

Marketing and Instructional Design
(Back to TOP)

When do instructional systems designers assist in the design of textbooks?
When do instructional systems designers assist in the selection of visual images in textbooks?
When do instructional systems designers produce instructional objectives in marketing textbooks?
Why do instructional objectives in textbooks stifle student thinking?
When do instructional systems designers assist in the selection or rejection of cases that may or may not enhance student learning?
When do instructional systems designers assist in the selection of supporting textbook materials for both students and instructors?
When do instructional systems designers create test questions for mass marketing textbooks?

Marketing and Intangible Resources

What are the influences of intangible resources on marketing?

Marketing and International

Where is a discussion of different marketing practices in other nations in textbooks?

Marketing and the Law

What is the impact of class action law suites and marketing?
What is the impact of law suites and marketing?
What is the impact of the Bayh-Dole Act 1982 and the ownership of government research have on marketing education and practice?

Marketing and Military

Why is military force not discussed as a historic method of opening markets?
Why are the relationships between marketing success and government and military supported firms not discussed?
Why is the military research in marketing, PR, and PsyOp not identified and discussed in marketing textbooks?
What has been the role of the US military and government in supporting particular businesses and not-for-profit institutions after World War II?
What are the percent of stock held corporations that are represented as marketing successes that are partially or fully dependant on the US Military and government support?
What is the impact of building or closing of a military facilities and marketing?
What is the impact of military research and marketing?
What is the impact of military medicine and marketing?
What is the impact of military funded research and new product development in consumer marketing?

Marketing and Myths

Why are there no historic references to symbols in marketing textbooks?
What is the relationship between branding and ancient, ethnic, and mythic symbols?
What are the mythic stories and how do they influence current marketing thought?
Why have textbooks excluded the relationship between the transitions of life identified in myths and the focus of marketing efforts?
Where are the relationships between the myths and the stages of life and marketing?
Where are the relationships between the myths and how to live your life and marketing?
What are the relationships between the myths and the marketing of products and services?

Marketing and Nature

What is the relationship between nature and consumption?
What is the relationship between the collapse of nature and consumption?
What are the cost reductions acquired when consumption and nature are in harmony?

Marketing and New Product Development

What are the marketing implications of a 90% failure rate in new product development?
What does new product development actually mean?
Can a new product succeed without government support?
How are new products kept from the American market by the government?
How are new products kept from the American market by corporations?
How are new products kept from the American market by interest groups?
What is the relationship between theft and marketing?
How are new products kept from the American market by the military?
How are new products kept from the American market by the US Government?
How are used, banned, and out of date products sold outside of the USA?
How do donated products from the USA end up being sold. What are the implications for higher educations new focus on business development and the marketing of new products?

Marketing and Perception of Value

Why avoid a discussion of the diamond industry and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the pharmaceutical industry and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the jewelry industry and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the use of 14kt gold and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the cost of clothing and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the cost of junk food and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of medical care and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the private control of water and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the movie industry and consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of movie stars and athletes as role models for society?
Why avoid a discussion of drug companies withholding cures from the market place that are not economically viable?
Why avoid a discussion of duty free stores in airports and pricing?
Why avoid a discussion of the higher education industry and consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of the use of sex in marketing textbooks?
Why avoid a discussion of cell phone text message marketing, blogs, e-mail, and other new forms of marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the use of marketing and public relations by the government?
Why avoid a discussion of and individuals social skills and manners and success in marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the destruction of unions and the impact on consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of the destruction of the middle class?
Why avoid a discussion of consumer debt and the destruction of the middle class?
Why avoid a discussion of a two tiered education in the USA?
Why avoid a discussion of the change in all narrative to a focus on consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of the decline in vocabulary expansion in the media to increase consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of the changing of history to increase consumption?
Why avoid a discussion of the dominance of marketing over the TV, news, and movie industries?
Why avoid a discussion of the dominance of marketing in political marketing?
Why are public relations activities such a closely held secret?

Marketing and Philosophy
(Back to TOP)

What is the damage done to students by presenting marketing textbooks as the one absolute philosophical source of truth?
What are the philosophical linkages in marketing textbooks to a consumer society?
Why are alternative philosophies and their impact on marketing never discussed in textbooks?

Marketing and Physical Resources

What are the links between physical resources and marketing?

Marketing and Poetry

Why is poetry avoided as a form of marketing and marketing education?

Marketing and Pollution

Why avoid a discussion of the opportunities in marketing for firms that produce products with nontoxic components?
What is the relationship between trash and marketing?
What is the relationship between recycling and marketing?

Marketing and Public Relations

What is the role of independent associations in public relations and their influence on decision making?
What are the impact of articles and stories placed in the media as truth that are actually marketing advertisements?
Why are there no references to public relation campaigns that have been destructive to consumers and society?
Why is there no mention of public relation and the manufacturing of consent?
Why are there no references to the beginning of the field of public relations before World War I as a means of getting the USA in the war against Germany?
What are actual public relations campaigns and what have they historically been called upon to do by companies?
What is the real impact of the field of public relations on thinking and behavior in the world?
Why is the Creel Commission before World War I not discussed in marketing?
Why are the founding links to military propaganda not discussed?
Why are the founders of public relations not discussed?

Marketing and Regulation

How do regulatory decisions favor the marketing of one company over another?
What is the impact of unregulated birth control and marketing?
What is the impact of health care regulations and marketing?
What is the impact of corporate regulations and marketing?
What is the impact of trade regulations and marketing?
What is the impact of illegal drug regulations and marketing?
What is the impact of legal drug regulation and marketing? For example, caffeine.
What is the impact of new drug regulation and marketing?

Marketing and Religion
(Back to TOP)

Why avoid a discussion of religions conflicts with secular marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the influence of religious beliefs and their impact on marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the influence of the Catholic nuns and the building, managing, and marketing of major institutions for centuries?
Why avoid a discussion of Pope John Paul II and other leaders in the world position on materialism that is advocated and taught in marketing textbooks?
Why are there no historic references to religious symbols in marketing textbooks?
What is the relationship between branding and religious symbols?
What are the religious stories and how do they influence current marketing thought?
Why have textbooks excluded the relationship between the transitions of life identified in religion and the focus of marketing efforts?
Where are the relationships between the religious and the stages of life and marketing?
Where are the relationships between the religion and how to live your life and marketing?
What are the relationships between religion and the marketing of products and services?

Marketing and Retail

Why do marketing textbooks link retail industry success to the narrow view of customer satisfaction?

Marketing and Research

Why avoid a discussion of the number of failures derived from sound marketing research?
Where is the discussion of the lack of empirical studies that support anything presented in the mass marketing textbooks as marketing?

Marketing and Satire

Why avoid a discussion of the use of satire as a form of marketing and marketing education?

Marketing and Science
(Back to TOP)

Why avoid a discussion of the current applications of neuroscience in marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the scientific method and how it is not applied to marketing research?
Where is the discussion of the weaknesses of science as an approach to marketing?
Why is reason inferred to be a more powerful motivator in marketing textbooks than emotion?
Why are scientific advancements in sounds, smells, touch, fear creation, and mass manipulation of behaviors not discussed in mass marketing textbooks?
Why are scientific advancements in subliminal messaging avoided in mass marketing textbooks?
Why is a limited explanation of subliminal messaging in a mass marketing textbook suspect?

Marketing and Small Business

How do marketing textbooks define a small business?

Marketing and Social Status

Why avoid a discussion of social status as a driving force of marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the universal overcharging in one market to undercharge in another?
What is the influence of social status on marketing?

Marketing and Storytelling

What is the power of storytelling in marketing?
Why are the classic stories recreated and changed to sell products to the young?

Marketing and Teens
(Back to TOP)

What is the negative influence and impact of marketing on teenagers?
Marketing and Television
What are the impact on TV, mass media, the internet, and movies on national and international power?

Marketing and Theory W

What is the role of organizational leadership in marketing decisions? (Morris) E-book on this website.

Marketing and Textbook Costs

What are the actual differences in marketing textbook content sold to community college, undergraduate, and graduate programs?
Why is the cost of marketing textbooks 71% less on half.com?
What is the difference of marketing content among mass marketing textbooks?
Where is the transparency in the amount of financial support and payments by textbook companies to universities, institutions, schools, organizations, and professor outside of the USA?
What are the percentages of advertising sharing to bookstores given by textbook publishers?
What are the percentages of advertising sharing to universities given by textbook publishers?
What is the cost to industry to put inserts into textbooks.

Marketing and Transnational Corporations

Why are the transnational corporations and their marketing practices avoided in marketing textbooks?

Marketing and War
(Back to TOP)

What is the influence of WW II on current marketing thought?
What is the influence of any war in history on changes in consumption patterns and new products?

Marketing and Why

Why are mission statements included when there is no research evidence that they have value?
Why is there a discussion of needs and wants when there is no agreement on their definitions?
Why are there so many unnecessary and useless changes in process in textbooks?
Why is there a discussion of goals and objectives with no differentiation or agreement on a definition in marketing textbooks?
What do instructional support materials actually look like?
Why is the internet not used for marketing cases?
Why hard cover textbooks?
Why is there a teachers addition of a textbook?
Why are there colored pictures, pages, and graphs for students in textbooks?
What are the benefits of colored advertisements in marketing textbooks to the companies paying for them?
Why does television programming content create fear of Muslims, blacks, priests, professors, Christians, and police?
Why is stupid considered better than smart in the content and design of textbooks?

Marketing and Why Not

Why is there no required statement to the reader of a textbook of what is paid for marketing and what is supposed to be learning material in textbooks?
Why is there no required statement to the reader of a textbook that a case study was made up or taken from actual sources?
Why is dialogue not used as a form of marketing and marketing education?
When do marketing textbooks contain varied opinions from a wide spectrum of though?
Why no discussion of marketing textbooks and there absolute confusion and focus on many process, methods, and planning models?

Marketing and World History

Where are references to the 18th century Enlightenment as the foundation for current marketing research?
Why is the real power and application of historic symbols overlooked and described as brand names in marketing textbooks?

Marketing Issues That Are Avoided in Textbooks
(Back to TOP)

Why are there no historic chronologies of events leading to any current marketing theory or practice in textbooks?
What are the potential dangers of cell phones?
What is the role of marketing textbooks in the creation of self obsessed marketing consumers?
What are the potential relationships between marketing and an increase in attention deficit in children?
What are the reasons why marketing academics has failed to link the cathode ray tubes in TVs and computers to harmful damage in the USA?
Why is marketing that includes advertising to consumers within the narrative content of entertainment programming and written material in magazines and newspapers not discussed?
Why are there no references of the relationships and the overlapping of PR, marketing, and PsyOp?
What is the influence of organized crime on marketing?
Why avoid a discussion of the influence of illegal drug sales on marketing?
Why are the union movement and the increase in salaries and benefits to labor avoided in marketing textbooks?
Why is Henry Ford given the credit for increasing worker wealth and not unions?
What are the historic chronology of private label marketing and the destruction of A&P?
Why is the word or reference to tribe excluded from marketing textbooks?
What is the relationship between the union movement and the creation of the middle class?
Why avoid a discussion of foods containing addictive and harmful substances and the role of marketing in this epidemic?
Why are there so few identified weaknesses or misdeeds of any corporations in textbooks?
Where is the discussion of the difficulty of moving textbook marketing to marketing practice?

Marketing to Children

What is the role of marketing in the increased focus on the sales to children?
What physical harm may be caused to children from the structure of television programming and advertising in the USA and the world.

My Thoughts

Students are happy to learn marketing from the mass marketed textbooks because they are young and do not yet know the ways of business.
Professors remain silent about the unethical behavior of teaching from mass marketing textbooks because the provost and president of the university will attempt to fire them for breach of contract.
University presidents do not stop the exploitation of student textbooks because they are sharing in a great deal of money through their bookstore sales.
Marketing practitioners remain silent because the actual knowledge and practice of marketing is too important to share with marketing professors and students.
Scholarly and professional organizations remain silent because they have become dependant on the support of textbook conglomerates.

THE FOLLOWING GROUPS HAVE BECOME ADDICTED TO TEXTBOOKS.

Textbook Dependent Business Schools

Why are business school deans silent about textbook exploitation of students?
Where is the discussion in marketing academic circles of why some universities do not consider the production of a textbook by a professor as a scholarly activity?
Why is deviation from following a marketing textbook deemed as drifting from the course content by deans?
Why do business deans avoid asking questions on student evaluations that may lead to the elimination of textbooks?
If the rate of failure of new product development is 90% why are business schools deans obsessed with changing marketing curriculum while keeping the same textbooks?
Why do business school deans force marketing and accounting to take the same approach to course content and instruction?
Why do schools of business keep practitioners from the classroom?
Why do business schools encourage students to ask questions of practitioners rather that have their professors point-of-view challenged or supported?
Are business schools following the AMA ethical guidelines?
 
Textbook Dependent Marketing Author (s)
(Back to TOP)

How much of the content of introductory marketing textbooks is written by a professor author (s)?
How much of the content of additional editions of marketing textbooks are written by a professor author (s)?
What is the role of a literary agent in the agreements between an author and a textbook company?
Are marketing professor author (s) required to sign a confidentially agreement with textbook publishers?
What rights do textbook author (s) receive from textbook publishers with different applications, delivery systems, markets, and usage of their textbooks?
What are the different forms of compensation that marketing professor author (s) receive from textbook companies?
How much can a marketing professor make by having their name on a large introductory textbook?
Why are professors who only supply overall direction on a textbook and no content represented as the author (s)?
What are the different forms of compensation to authors that supply direction and their name to textbooks?
How much influence does a professor author (s) of a textbook have in what is included, excluded, changed, and taken out of their textbook?
How much influence does a professor author (s) of a textbook have in determining instructional goals and objectives outlined in their textbook?
How are multiple professor names on a textbook selected and for what academic purpose?
Who decides when a new author or co-author is added or removed from a textbook?
Who decides when to add more co-authors to an international edition of a textbook?
What are the responsibilities of added international textbook edition co-authors?
What is the relationship between the amount of work done and a professors name on a textbook?
Can a professor have their name on a textbook for no contribution? 
Why do marketing professor authors never debate the inclusion and exclusion of textbook content?
How many textbook authors have incorporated any marketing research done by the military?
After the death of a textbook author what are their estates royalties on future editions with new authors?
After the death of a professor that is a textbook coordinator author what royalties does their estate receive?

Textbook Dependent Marketing Author (s)

How much of the content of introductory marketing textbooks is written by a professor author (s)?
How much of the content of additional editions of marketing textbooks are written by a professor author (s)?
What is the role of a literary agent in the agreements between an author and a textbook company?
Are marketing professor author (s) required to sign a confidentially agreement with textbook publishers?
What rights do textbook author (s) receive from textbook publishers with different applications, delivery systems, markets, and usage of
their textbooks?
What are the different forms of compensation that marketing professor author (s) receive from textbook companies?
How much can a marketing professor make by having their name on a large introductory textbook?
Why are professors who only supply overall direction on a textbook and no content represented as the author (s)?
What are the different forms of compensation to authors that supply direction and their name to textbooks?
How much influence does a professor author (s) of a textbook have in what is included, excluded, changed, and taken out of their textbook?
How much influence does a professor author (s) of a textbook have in determining instructional goals and objectives outlined in their textbook?
How are multiple professor names on a textbook selected and for what academic purpose?
Who decides when a new author or co-author is added or removed from a textbook?
Who decides when to add more co-authors to an international edition of a textbook?
What are the responsibilities of added international textbook edition co-authors?
What is the relationship between the amount of work done and a professors name on a textbook?
Can a professor have their name on a textbook for no contribution? 
Why do marketing professor authors never debate the inclusion and exclusion of textbook content?
How many textbook authors have incorporated any marketing research done by the military?
After the death of a textbook author what are their estates royalties on future editions with new authors?
After the death of a professor that is a textbook coordinator author what royalties does their estate receive?

Textbook Dependent Marketing Departments
(Back to TOP)

Do current marketing textbooks represent a core of knowledge required to be successful in marketing practice?
What concepts in the mass marketing textbooks have been empirically derived?
How much research funding is given by textbook companies to marketing departments of institutions with large undergraduate and graduate majors?
How many marketing department are one hundred percent dependant on mass marketing textbooks and their testing?
Where are the discussions in marketing departments of ways to simplify marketing content?
Why are senior marketing faculty members or a chairperson given the power to select the textbooks for large textbook dependant undergraduate and graduate marketing courses without safeguards?
What are the influence of textbook publishers on departmental and institutional decisions to tenure or promote marketing professors?
Why are marketing departments so preoccupied with searching for new courses and programs when they have failed to transfer to their students the knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to marketing?
Why are there so few professors in marketing that have an Irish background?
Of all the marketing courses taught in the USA how many do not have a mass marketing textbook?
What studies have been done relating the added features in textbook to marketing practice?
Why would a marketing department allow the provost and president to compel them to teach the exact same textbook content and take the exact same textbook exam?
How many marketing department are aware of the advanced research and findings in the military?
Why do universities, business schools, and academic departments force professors to adopt textbooks from a very small number of textbook conglomerates?
How can the members of a marketing department justify the continued repeating of the same content in new additions?
How can the members of a marketing department justify the teaching of concepts of marketing that have not changed since McCarthy and the 4 Ps?
Why do marketing departments suggest that the internet has changed marketing but continue to teach the same textbook content?
Why do marketing departments continue follow a marketing textbook model developed during the cold war?
How can marketing departments in a changing discipline fix course content?
Why do marketing departments avoid discussions with practitioners in front of their students?
What are monolinear, polylinear and nonlinear marketing?
Are marketing departments following the AMA ethical guidelines?

Textbook Dependent Marketing Professors
(Back to TOP)

Why do so few marketing professors challenge textbook content?
Why do marketing professors continue to condone the rising cost of textbooks to students?
Why is it so difficult for professors to publish any textbook or journal articles in marketing that do not follow sanitized textbook and journal content?
What are the reasons why professors spend time on their own narrow interests while avoiding the larger issue of their students broad educational success?
How does a philosophy of intellectual elitism influence marketing professors to participate in the dumbing down of their students?
Why do marketing professors reject their so called low end students?
Where are the university programs to upgrade marketing professor internet application of marketing KSA?
Why do marketing professors believe that they cannot help all their students to achieve mastery?
Why do marketing professors that support grade distributions have such preconceived beliefs?
How many marketing professors can differentiate between process and content in marketing textbooks?
How does a marketing professors preconceived belief about grade distribution become a self fulfilling prophecy?
How many marketing professors have identified any marketing research done in the US military?
Why do marketing professors believe that showing compassion and assisting students in time of need as a sign of weaknesses?
Why would a marketing professor be compelled to demonstrate a broad distribution of grades by the provost and president have any incentive to help more than half their students to succeed?
Why are marketing professors discouraged from encouraging students to search the internet for a broad range of information gathered in marketing courses?
How many marketing professors actually read a marketing textbook?
Where would a marketing professor find an objective signed review of a marketing textbook?
When the introductory principles textbooks are lacking in content, instructional systems design, and accurate examples how can advanced marketing courses challenge this with different content, instructional systems design, and examples?
Why do marketing professors reject internet research findings?
Why are marketing professors that teach from their own experiences encouraged or forced to follow textbook explanations?
Why would a professor of marketing reject internet content that contains a broad range of points of view?
Why would a marketing professor want to limit student exposure to a single perception and point of view?
Why are real examples shared by the professor with students labeled as talking about them self and not equal to a highly edited textbook?
Why are professors oblivious of the control and omission of history in marketing textbooks?
Why do marketing professors support the use of students to disrupt classes of professors that do not follow the textbook that are sent by top administration to defend textbooks?
How many marketing professors could sell anything using the material in the marketing textbook?
How many marketing professors have spent time with marketing practitioners?
What, if any is the relationship between marketing journal articles and marketing practice?
What, if any is the relationship between marketing journal articles and textbook content?
How many marketing professors have taught or consulted in marketing in or outside of the USA?
How many marketing professors have worked in marketing at any business level?
How many marketing professors have discussed the relationship and interaction between marketing and other areas of the corporation?
How many marketing professors have discussed the relationship and interaction between marketing and liberal arts?
How many marketing professors have discussed the relationship and interaction between marketing and different religions?
How can professors of marketing profess to students that marketing is as simple as following the textbook?
What studies have been done comparing textbook content with marketing practice?
If marketing professors are unable to differentiate marketing practice from textbook content what are the probabilities they will select new areas of study that are any more successful?
Why do marketing professors encourage students to ask questions of practitioners rather than entering into a dialogue in front of their students?
How many marketing professors discuss personal marketing experiences that were not successful with students?
Why do we expect professors to be unbiased and to tell many truths?
Do marketing professors follow the AMA ethical guidelines?

Textbook Dependent Professors
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What actual knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to marketing practice do marketing textbook dependant professors receive from the content of mass marketed textbooks?
Why are professors discouraged from using their own books and materials in large introductory courses?
Why do textbook dependant professors require a 656 page instructors manual?
Why do textbook dependant professors require a 368 page study guide?
Why do textbook dependant professors require a 618 page textbook supplement of test questions?
Were the test questions changes with the changes in the textbooks?
Why do textbook dependant professors require hundreds of textbook overhead transparencies?
Why do textbook dependant professors require PowerPoint presentations that follow the textbook?
Why do marketing professors who adhere to the marketing textbook refuse to discuss and debate their beliefs?
Why would a textbook dependant professor discuss in class any marketing topics that will not appear on their textbook created exams?
How much assistance do textbook companies give textbook dependant professors in the grading of textbook exam questions?
Why do textbook dependant academics in marketing fail to identify textbook firms as for profit enterprises?
Why do textbook dependant marketing professors believe that for profit firms would produce content that will assist students in marketing practice?
Do textbook dependent professors follow marketing textbooks as a form of self protection from students, fellow professors, provosts and college presidents?
When a student complains about a marketing professor that identifies textbook flaws or avoids the textbook why are is the professor then accused of not teaching marketing?
Why are textbook dependent marketing professors so reluctant to take their own path and admit that marketing textbooks are inadequate?
Why do textbook dependent marketing professors prefer a marketing case study written in 1991 for over the internet to gather current information on a company?
How many textbook dependant marketing professors can differentiate between process and content in a textbook?
Why do textbook dependant professors believe that there is such a thing as a marketing case?
Do textbook dependant professors follow the AMA ethical guidelines?

Textbook Dependent Scholarly and Professional Organizations

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Why is there little discussion of direct and indirect revenue support by textbook companies to scholarly and professional organizations?
Is the space at marketing scholarly and professional organizations conferences sold for high prices to textbook companies?
What are the influences of textbook conglomerates and private industry on the marketing of journals in the selection, editing, and creation of articles?
What are the direct and indirect support to the AMA from military, government, private and public universities, consulting firms, individuals, nonprofits, and corporations.
How much direct and indirect revenue is spent on marketing journals and newspapers?
What percent of the revenue per year of the AMA comes through private industry support?
What percent of the contributions to the AMA comes from textbook publishers?
What are the yearly direct and indirect contributions to the AMA from marketing textbook authors.
What are the relationships between the AMA and AACSB?
What is the relationship between marketing departments who purchasing a large number of textbooks and access to publishing in top journals?
Why do marketing scholarly and professional organizations protect the position of the textbook as the best form of instructional delivery?
Where are research articles that study the textbook industry, content and instruction in top journals?
Why do accrediting organizations suggest that the least academically qualified professors are acceptable to teach large undergraduate introductory marketing courses?
Why are losers, the untenured, women, and international professors put into the large textbook dependant undergraduate marketing courses?
What influence do textbook publishers have over scholarly and professional organizations through advertising and research support?
Are scholarly and professional organizations following the AMA ethical guidelines?

Textbook Dependent Students
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Why are textbook dependant students so convinced that textbook content in marketing represents a single truth?
Why do textbook dependant students reject marketing examples from outside of the USA?
Why do textbook dependant students reject marketing examples from the liberal arts?
Why do textbook dependant students reject marketing examples that identify the difficulties in successful marketing practice?
Why are textbook dependant students so hostile when fellow students are encouraged to succeed in their marketing class?
Why are textbook dependant students so afraid of failure when other forms of instruction are brought into the classroom?
Why are textbook dependant students so afraid of different forms of evaluation that differ from those created by textbook companies?
Why are the textbook dependant students so aggressive against fellow students that they view as inferior?
Why do textbook dependant students believe that marketing topics not discussed in the textbook are outside of the field?
Why do textbook dependant students prefer the textbook examples over those of the professor?
Why do textbook dependant students prefer the textbook examples over those on the internet?
How often do textbook dependent professors invite practitioners to class?
How many textbook dependant students can differentiate between process and content in marketing textbooks?
What is the impact of a decline in state and national funding of higher education on the marketing education of marketing students?

Textbook Dependent Universities

Why are discussions of textbooks at universities restricted to their high cost?
Why is there little interest in the provost and president of universities helping students suffering from textbook addiction?
How can university presidents justify the creation and support of campus monopolies that sell textbooks to a captive audience of students?
Why are textbooks sold for the benefit of the university and not the professor or students?
Why do university presidents wait to post the textbooks for courses until the classes have begun?
Why are university resources and labor applied by the president to enhance the sales of marketing textbooks from their leased or owned campus bookstores?
Where does the year end bonus come from that is given to the university by the bookstore?
Why is a university president able to rent bookstore space for up to 30% higher market cost to bookstore vendors?
Why are student complaints of professors not following the textbook taken so seriously by university presidents?
How much money will universities loose if professors begin to openly reject marketing textbooks?
Why are campus bookstores concerned when large marketing principles course textbook sales are not within certain parameters?
How many university presidents call on marketing professors to assist in marketing?
What is the amount of money paid directly and indirectly to higher educational institutions each year by textbook companies?
What type of benefits can a university receive from bookstores for a long term contract with the university?
What is the amount of money paid to universities for the rental space to bookstore companies?
Why do universities publish student reviews of professors but not textbooks?
Why do institutions allow their professors to review textbooks for money and then put the name of their institution in the front of the textbook?
Why is there a lack of transparency of the money given by textbook companies to universities, business schools, and professors through third party organizations?
What happened to the inferred promises by universities that when a student takes marketing courses they will be more prepared than other majors on the job?
Why would a university president forgo student success in marketing to reap the profits of over priced irrelevant textbooks?
Why is it difficult to encourage professors, departments, schools of business, and universities to place a copy of each textbook on reserve in the library?
When are not-for-profit universities going to share with students the revenue generated through their bookstore textbook sales, textbook firms, and organizational donations of conceal textbook firm donations?
How many university presidents have identified the superior research and findings in marketing in the military?
Why do universities do so little to assist professors in the development of their own testing and instructional systems design?
Why can a president of a university that competes in the marketplace force their marketing professors to continue the textbook charade?
How often has the president of a university read a textbook in marketing or any other field out side of their own?
Why do we expect university presidents and provosts to let many truths to be told?
Are university presidents and provosts following the AMA ethical guidelines?

Textbook Dependent University Presidents
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Why so greedy?
Why sell the institution for thirty pieces of silver?
Textbook Independent Marketing Practitioners
Why are marketing practitioners silent about the stated marketing textbook content in relationship to actual practice?
Why should a marketing practitioner inform academics of new cutting edge marketing practice?
If practitioners were to inform marketing academics would this information make it to textbook content?
When a marketing idea appears in a textbook why does it no longer retain any value in marketing practice?
Why are new cutting edge marketing ideas found on PBS long before textbooks?
Are marketing practitioners following the AMA ethical guidelines?

PARTIAL LIST OF QUESTIONS TO THE ABOVE DEPENDENT PEOPLE WHY PROCESS IS CHANGED SO OFTEN FOR NEW CONTENT IN THE MASS MARKETING TEXTBOOKS

Number One

For what possible instructional reason would any marketing textbook contain 75 changes in process?

Number Two

For what possible instructional reason would marketing textbooks forgo student learning and become another form of advertising?

Number Three

For what possible instructional reason would universities dictate that marketing textbooks are required when they demonstrate minimal transfer to marketing thought or practice?

Number Four

For what possible instructional reason would four textbook conglomerates determine the marketing curriculum? (Three of the four conglomerates are owned outside of the USA.)

Number Five

For what possible instructional reason would marketing professors participate in this textbook driven deception?

Number Six

For what possible instructional reason would the government let this happen to marketing students?

Number Seven

For what possible instructional reason should form, force, and power and 6+ or 3 be excluded from marketing education and practice? (Morris)

What is the relationship between the cost of money and success in marketing?

What is the role of marketing and excessive credit card interest rates, fees, and penalties?

REAL QUESTIONS TO THE TEXTBOOK CONGLOMERATES

Marketing Textbook Oligopoly
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How can a textbook be sold in a campus bookstore for $150 and $50 online?

How did textbook companies become cartels?

How do bias guidelines affect textbook content?

How much of the textbook is marketing to students and how much is educational?

How often are textbook companies sued for their textbook content?

How many editions of a mass marketing textbook test question supplements have remained the same?

How much more money can the textbook conglomerates receive from advertisers for the three hundred plus advertising photographs added to textbooks with such high color resolution?

Why do marketing textbook companies consider paying professors to review their textbooks as an honest and ethical practice?

Why do textbook companies sanitize the content of marketing textbooks?

What is the impact of textbook conglomerates also owning test development companies?

What do textbook companies actually do with the reviews produced by professors?

Do textbooks publishers use their content as a source for their mass market testing questions?
 
Why are three of the four largest textbook conglomerates in the world owned by companies outside to the USA?

Why do textbook companies pay marketing professors several hundred dollars to review their introductory textbooks?

What are the reasons why textbooks are sold for so much less outside the USA?

Why are textbooks outside of the USA labeled not to be sold in the USA?

How much of the marketing content in textbooks is written by outside firms?
 
How can a textbook with two authors in the USA become two separate textbooks with each authors having the same textbook with different titles?

How can a textbook with two authors in the USA have one author in the international edition?

Where are the direct references in textbooks to scientifically derived sources?

Why do the textbook publishing conglomerates refuse to purge their marketing textbooks of outdated and no longer useful concepts in marketing?

When textbook exam questions are created why is there no consideration for answers that would be considered corporate best practice?

Why do answers to textbook exam questions defy common sense when selecting a marketing answer?

Why do textbook conglomerates increase the cost of textbooks for students by adding more pages?

Why are there constant changes in textbook editions with almost no change in content?

How do conglomerate publishers increase sales by destroy the sales of their own textbook editions?

Do textbook conglomerates pressure their employees when producing textbooks to attain greater profits by forgoing marketing content?
Why are no materials, ideas, and words included in marketing textbooks that may challenge or decrease textbook sales?

Should large textbook conglomerates have the final authority to exclude and edit content?

What is the role of textbook content in the decline of literacy rates?
What do textbook companies define as objectionable thoughts that they edited out?

Why do textbook publishers and administrators want to increase distant learning that will move the sale of textbook content to the domain of the digital realm?

Do corporations pay the textbook companies to have their names referenced in a textbook?

Do corporations pay the textbook companies to have their firm on textbook video supplements?

Do corporations pay to have their advertisements in the textbook?
Are textbook oligopolies following the AMA ethical guidelines?

Marketing and Textbook Creation

Who is responsible for updating textbook reference lists?

Who is responsible for the grafts, photos, and charts that appear in textbooks?

Who is responsible for the advertisements disguised as case studies as in textbooks?

Who is responsible for the advertisements disguised as test questions in textbooks?

Who is responsible for the advertisements disguised as video examples in textbooks?

Who is responsible for the selling of space in the textbooks to corporations?

Who is responsible for the questions asked at the end of each chapter in a textbook?

Who is responsible for instructional objectives in a textbook?
Who is responsible for the marketing content in the first edition of a textbook?

Who is responsible for changes in marketing content in new textbook editions?

Who is responsible for the exclusion of language and content within the textbook firms?

Why do textbooks have multiple editors?

What are the links between learning objectives and textbook content?
Are objectives produced before or after a marketing textbook is written?

What are the reading levels of marketing textbooks?

What is the amount of transfer of content in a textbook for students who fall below the textbook reading level?

What is the economic benefit to the publisher of putting the chapter on the internet and marketing content on the internet and not in the textbook?

Would a marketing textbook company separate internet marketing content from previously created textbook content to obscure and maintain their ineffective coverage of marketing?

Textbook Company Marketing
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How much do textbook companies charge for lists of names and information on marketing professors.

Why have textbook companies created textbook scholarships for students?

How often do textbook companies take the same exact book and change the title and cover and sell it as a new textbook?

How do textbook companies take advantage of law by put the a year ahead?

What are the ethics of giving textbooks to professors that they can sell for 25 to 40 dollars a piece to venders?

What is the amount of transfer of content in a textbook for students who are far above the textbook reading level?

Why do the thirteen positive quoted reviews in the front of a famous mass marketing textbook have no names attached?

Do the firms who advertise their products and services in marketing textbooks select the location, size, and number of color images per-textbook?

Do firms that advertise in marketing textbooks through cases have final authority to edit content?
 
What are the learning outcomes from the inclusion of color advertisements in marketing textbooks and the add cost to American students?

What are the actual learning outcomes for students in relationship to the number of fancy charts, photographs, cases, objectives, and content in marketing textbooks?

Are there any differences in reading level in any mass marketing textbooks?

What are the links between learning objectives and textbook content?
What are the reading levels of marketing textbooks?

Why do the thirteen positive quoted reviews in the front of a famous mass marketing textbook have no names attached?

Are there any differences in reading level in any mass marketing textbooks?

WHAT WILL HAPPEN WHEN THE STUDENTS AND THE LAW FINDS ALL THIS OUT?

What May Be Considered?
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Marketing professors ought to consider taking responsibility for the total content of their courses.

Textbooks ought to be excluded from marketing courses.

Marketing professors ought to return to the path of the teacher/scholar and not remain a functionary of a textbook conglomerate.

Universities ought to get out of the textbook business.

Textbook dependant professors ought to be encouraged to produce their own course materials before they become redundant.

Instructional systems designers ought to assist marketing professors in their transition.

Marketing professor ought to receive credit toward tenure and promotion that relates to real world marketing experience.

The outrageous complicity of presidential leadership of universities and the destruction of the middle class through textbook conformity ought to be stopped.

Universities ought to have their own publishing and internet outlets for articles and books of professors and staff.

Universities ought not to edit professor materials that appear on the university web pages because it runs counter to textbook marketing content.

Fellow marketing colleague ought to only be available for positive assistance but not to stand in judgment of any colleague in relationship to instructional systems design or content applied in marketing?

Student testing ought to be the domain of each professor.
The creation of exams should be done by the professor and not taken from a textbook list.

Student evaluations ought to only be given and read by the professor.
University provosts and presidents ought not to pass judgment that one method of instructional systems design is better than another.
If professors want to use a mass market textbook they ought to have to identify the weaknesses in the textbook to their students in the syllabus.

Marketing cases ought to be created by the professor.

Professors who rely on textbooks will be replaced by individuals with far less education.

Professors ought to combine both training and wisdom in their marketing courses.

Students that insist on a textbook education ought to be encouraged to broaden their education.

Business schools ought to use instructional systems designers to teach students how to learn before they take courses.

Marketing professors ought to be able to return to a focus of linking to the liberal arts.

Marketing professors ought to explore how to apply form, force, and power to marketing.

Am I following the AMA ethical guidelines? I think so, but I suppose all of the above also think so.

Marketing Students, Marketing Professors, University Presidents, Marketing Practitioners, Textbook Conglomerate Leadership, and Scholarly and Professional Organizations et al.

WHY?

Why is This Happening?
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Working and middle class students who never will work in marketing, PsyOp, public relations, or textbook publishing can leave their university business education thinking they will not be manipulated and vulnerable to real marketing practices.

The political direction of the USA has changed and with that change comes a reorganization of power.

If you would like video discussions by the author that are discussing textbooks on my weekly radio show The Professors with Dr. Joel Marks e-mail me and I will try to send to you.

From my calculations in a 651 page major mass marketing American textbook owned by a conglomerate outside of the USA 447 pages are unnecessary by any standard. Of the rest of the pages I would speculate that about half have any current value to students. This means that 52 page have any possible transfer to marketing practice. The cost of the latest edition of this textbook is around $140 or $2.69 per page. The cost of the last edition with the same content is about $7 dollars or 13 cents per page. Do textbooks represent the best or worst of marketing. Morris 2005

Textbooks tell a story. To decipher a textbook leads us back to the story that it tells. Marketing textbooks have nothing to do with learning marketing. In the current marketing textbooks the story learned is not marketing but consumption. They are a post world War II propaganda technique to help us to protect the nation from the Soviet Union.


CONTENT II
TEXTBOOKS: DISCOURSE ON METHOD

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THIS SECTION IS WHERE TWO MARKETING TEXTBOOKS ARE ASSESSED FOR REPEATING PROCESSES OR METHODS. THIS IS AN ABSOLUTE WASTE OF LEARNER TIME. IT IS SIMPLY A WAY OF MAKING LESS SEEM LIKE MORE IN ALL WAYS.
THIS IS EDUCATIONAL TYRANNY THAT SO MANY PARTICIPATE IN FOR MONEY.

The concept of discourse on method goes back to the Enlightenment in Europe. Ren Descartes
1637 put forth the underlying premise of science in his book. He proposed "I think, therefore I am." This began the separation of mind and body in Western science.

Descartes proposed that science should be verifiable through reason and supportable through mathematics. This means that marketing must be represented in a particular way and that way must be verified or tested through math. So to achieve this goal they created a body of knowledge called marketing in textbooks.

To make this scientific the math or testing component of marketing is then judged in relationship to that created material. The problem is that none of it works. But it does not matter because now marketing is a verifiable science. To suggest that it is derived from stories would mean disaster because how would this material be judged mathematically.

Who on earth could take responsibility. Corporate textbook conglomerates enter and convince a few professors to rat out learning marketing. Anyone that suggest otherwise is a heretic of science and should be burned at the stake. For example me.

Textbook design and lack of a learner (student) focus in is amazing. Perhaps criminal? Perhaps universal? Perhaps genius?

All these changes in process below are brilliance, ignorance, or evil. All the marketing textbook authors create the same outcome. Once you figure it out that the text itself is marketing you will be a great deal better in marketing than your textbook teacher.

Professors if it takes you one year stay on this page until you understand what damage you are doing to your students.


CONTENT III
KOTLER & ARMSTRONG & LAMB, HAIR, MCDANIEL MARKETING TEXTBOOKS

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Kotler & Armstrong 11th ed. 2006,
Person Prentice-Hall


75 Identified Changes in Process in 651 pages

Identified by chapter and pages.

Chapter 1 Kotler and Armstrong 11ed 2006

Five Different Process Models Identified
1.1 A simple Model of the Marketing Process Page 5
1.1.1 Understanding the market place and customer needs and wants 1.1.2 Designing a customer driven marketing strategy
1.1.3 Constructing a marketing program that delivers superior value
1.1.4 Build profitable relationships and build customer delight
1.1.5 Customer value from customers to create profits and customer quality
1.2 Designing a Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy Page 8
1.2.1 Selecting customers to serve
1.2.2 Choosing a value proposition
1.2.3 Marketing management orientations
1.2.4 Preparing a marketing plan and programs
1.2.5 Building customer relationships
1.2.6 Changing nature of customer relationships
1.3 Selling and Marketing Concepts Contrasted Page 11
1.3.1 Starting point
1.3.2 Focus
1.3.3 Means
1.3.4 Ends

1.4 Capturing Value from Customers Page 19
1.4.1 Creating customer loyalty and retention
1.4.2 Growing share of customer
1.4.3 Building customer equity
1.5 Expanded Model of the Marketing Process Page 28
1.5.1 Understanding the marketplace and customer needs and wants
1.5.2 Design customer driven marketing strategy
1.5.3 Construct a marketing program that delivers superior value
1.5.4 Build profitable relationships
1.5.5 Capture value from customers to create profits and customer equality

Chapter 2 Twelve Different Process Models Identified

2.1 Companywide Strategic Planning Page 37
2.1.1 Defining company mission
2.1.2 Setting company objectives and goals
2.1.3 Design the business portfolio
2.1.4 Planning marketing and other functional strategies

2.2 Designing the Current Business Portfolio Page 39
2.2.1 Analyzing the current business portfolio
2.2.2 Developing strategies for growth
2.2.3 Shape the future portfolio by developing strategies for downsizing

2.3. Portfolio Analysis Page 39
2.3.1 Identify the Key businesses making up the company
2.3.2 Management assess the attractiveness of its various SBUs
2.3.3 How much support each deserves
2.3.4 Focus on adding products and businesses that fit

2.4 Profitable growth Page 41
2.4.1 Identify
2.4.2 Evaluate
2.4.3 Select market opportunities
2.4.4 Lay down strategies for capturing them

2.5 Identifying Growth Opportunities Page 41
2.5.1 Determine market penetration
2.5.2 Consider possibilities for market development
2.5.3 Consider product development and/or diversification

2.6 Planning Marketing Partnerships to Build Customer Relationships Page 44
2.6.1 Partnering with other company departments
2.6.2 Partnering with other in marketing system

2.7 Managing Marketing Strategy and the Marketing Mix Page 47
2.7.1 Marketing analysis
2.7.2 Marketing planning
2.7.3 Marketing implementation
2.7.4 Marketing control

2.8 Planning the Details of the Marketing Mix Page 50
2.8 1 Marketing mix consists of everything that the firm can to influence the demand for products

2.9 Managing the Marketing Effort Page 51
2.9.1 Marketing analysis
2.9.2 Planning: Develop strategic plan
2.9.3 Implementation: Carry out the plan
2.9.4 Control: Measure results, evaluate results, take corrective action

2.10 Content of Marketing Plan Page 52
2.10.1 Executive summary
2.10.2 Current marketing Situation
2.10.3 Threats and opportunities
2.10.4 Objectives and issues
2.10.5 Marketing strategy
2.10.6 Action programs
2.10.7 Budgets
2.10.8 Control

2.11 Marketing Environment Page 55
2.11.1 Analyze its environment
2.11.2 Forces close to the company that affect its ability to serve customers
2.11.3 Includes broader demographic and economic forces

2.12 Measuring and Managing Return on Marketing Page 55
2.12.1 Measuring and managing effectiveness of marketing investment
2.12.2 Developing better measures of return on marketing
2.12.3 Measures the profit generated by investment
2.12.4 Assess return on marketing

Chapter 3 Six Different Process Models Identified

3.1 The Companys Microenvironment Page 65
3.1.1 In designing marketing plans, marketing management takes other company groups into account
3.1.2 Watch supply availability
3.1.3 Selecting and partnering with resellers
3.1.4 Study five types of customers
3.1.5 Gain strategic advantage
3.1.6 Public is any group that has an actual or potential interest in or impact on an organizations ability to achieve its objectives

3.2 Top Management Page 65
3.2.1 Sets company mission
3.2.2 Objectives
3.2.3 Broad strategies
3.2.4 Policies

3.3 Under the Marketing Concept all Functions Must Page 65
3.3.1 Think Customer

3.4 Wal-Mart Buying Process Page 66
3.4.1 No mention in text at this point of what is Wal-Marts buying process

3.5 The Companys Microenvironment Page 68
3.5.1 Affect marketing plans, demographic forces, economic forces, natural forces, technological forces, Political forces, cultural forces

3.6 Environmentally Sustainable Strategies Page 82
3.6.1 No mention in text at this point of an environmentally strategic process.

Chapter 4 Twelve Different Process Models

4.1 Marketing Information System Page 100
4.1.1 Gather
4.1.2 Sort
4.1.3 Analyze
4.1.4 Evaluate
4.1.5 Distribute

4.2 Marketing Information System Page 102
4.2.1 Analysis
4.2.2 Planning
4.2.3 Implementation
4.2.4 Organization
4.2.5 Control

4.3 Marketing Intelligence Page 104
4.3.1 Collection
4.3.2 Analysis

4.4 Marketing Research Page 105
4.4.1 Design
4.4.2 Collection
4.4.3 Analysis
4.4.4 Reporting

4.5 Marketing Research Four Step Process Page 106
4.5.1 Define the problem and research objectives
4.5.2 Develop the research plan
4.5.3 Implement the research plan
4.5.4 Interpreting and reporting the findings

4.6 Planning Primary Data Collection Page 109
4.6.1 Research Approaches
4.6.2 Contact Methods
4.6.3 Sampling Plan
4.6.4 Research Instruments

4.7 Designing a Sample Page 116
4.7.1 Who is to be surveyed
4.7.1.1 What sampling unit
4.7.2 How many people
4.7.2.1 What sample size
4.7.3 How should the people in the sample be chosen
4.7.3.1 What sampling procedures

4.8 Open Ended Questions Page 116
4.8.1 What people think
4.8.2 How many people think in a certain way

4.9 Analysis Marketing Information Page 118
4.9.1 Analysis
4.9.2 Applying information
4.9.3 Collection of analytical models
4.9.3.1 What if
4.9.3.2 Which is best

4.10 Customer Research Management Page 119
4.10.1 Develop data warehouse
4.10.2 Data mining techniques
4.10.3 Pull together data
4.10.4 Sift through mounds of data
4.10.5 Dig out interesting findings about customers
4.10.6 Develop deeper customer relationships

4.11 Marketing Research in Small Business and Nonprofit Org. Page 122
4.11.1 Observing
4.11.2 Monitoring
4.11.3 Collecting
4.11.4 Evaluate
4.11.5 Experiment

4.12 International Marketing Research Page124
4.12.1 Defining the research problem
4.12.2 Developing a research plan
4.12.3 Reporting the results

Chapter 5 Five Different Process Models Identified

5.1 Model of Consumer Behavior Page 137
5.1.1 What consumers buy
5.1.2 Where they buy
5.1.3 How much they buy
5.1.4 When the buy
5.1.5 Why they buy

5.2 Motivation Research Page 149
5.2.1 Collect in-depth information
5.2.2 Uncover the deeper motives
5.2.3 Satisfy most important need first

5.3 Perception Page 152
5.3.1 Receives
5.3.2 Organizes
5.3.3 Interprets

5.4 Buyer Decision Process Page 155
5.4.1 Need recognition
5.4.2 Information search
5.4.3 Evaluation alternatives
5.4.4 Purchase decision
5.4.5 Post purchase behavior

5.5 Stages in Adoption Process Page 160
5.5.1 Awareness
5.5.2 Interest
5.5.3 Evaluation
5.5.4 Trial
5.5.5 Adoption

Chapter 6 Three Different Process Models Identified

6.1 Business Buyer Behavior Page 171
6.1.1 Determine which products and services
6.1.2 Find
6.1.3 Evaluate
6.1.4 Choose among alternative suppliers and brands

6.2 Business Buying Process Page 181
6.2.1 Problem recognition
6.2.2 General need description
6.2.3 Product specifications
6.2.4 Proposal solicitation
6.2.5 Supplier selection
6.2.6 Order-route specifications
6.2.7 Performance review

6.3 Government buying Page 186
6.3.1 Anticipate government needs and projects
6.3.2 Participate in the product specification phase
6.3.3 Gather competitive intelligence
6.3.4 Prepare bids
6.3.5 Produce stronger communications

Chapter 7 Five Different Process Models

7.1 Effective Segmentation Page 208
7.1.1 Measurable
7.1.2 Accessible
7.1.3 Substantial
7.1.4 Differentiable
7.1.5 Actionable

7.2 Evaluating Market Segments Page 209
7.2.1 Collect
7.2.2 Analyze
7.2.3 Examine major structural factors
7.2.4 Relative power of buyers
7.2.5 Assess suppliers that can control price and reduce quality
7.2.6 Assess company objectives and resources
7.2.7 Offer superior value and gain advantage

7.3 Target Market Strategies Page 210
7.3.1 Target broadly (Undifferentiated (mass) marketing)
7.3.2 Differentiated (segmented) marketing
7.3.3 Concentrated (niche) marketing
7.3.4 Target narrowly Micromarketing (local and individual marketing)

7.4 Choosing a Positioning Strategy Page 218
7.4.1 Identify a set of possible competitive advantages
7.4.2 Build a position
7.4.3 Choosing the right competitive advantage
7.4.4 Selecting an overall positioning strategy
7.4.5 Communicate and deliver the chosen position to the market

7.5 Developing a Positioning Statement Page 224
7.5.1 State the product membership category
7.5.2 Shows its point of difference
7.5.3 Placing a brand in a specific category
7.5.4 Brands superiority is made on its point of difference
7.5.5 Deliver and communicate the desired position to target consumers

Chapter 8 Six Different Process Models Identified

8.1 Products, Services, and Experiences Page 233
8.1.1 Staging
8.1.2 Marketing
8.1.3 Delivering memorable customer experiences
 

8.2 Levels of Product and Services Page 234
8.2.1 Define the core
8.2.2 Turn the core benefit into an actual product
8.2.3 Build an augmented product around the core benefit

8.3 Organizations, Persons, Places, and Ideas Page 237
8.3.1 Create attitudes and behaviors
8.3.2 Maintain attitudes and behaviors
8.3.3 Change attitudes and behaviors

8.4 Product and Service Attributes Page 239
8.4.1 Defining the benefits
8.4.2 Communicated product attributes
8.4.3 Delivered by product attributes

8.5 Cost of Providing Services Page 246
8.5.1 Assess the cost
8.5.2 Develop a package of services
8.5.3 Interview consumers

8.6 Product Mix Decisions Page 248
8.6.1 Add new product lines
8.6.2 Widen product mix
8.6.3 Lengthen existing product lines
8.6.4 Add more versions of each product
8.6.5 Pursue more or less product line consistency

Chapter 9 Three Different Process Models Identified

9.1 Steps in New-Product Development Page 276
9.1.1 Idea generation
9.1.2 Idea screening
9.1.3 Concept development and testing
9.1.4 Marketing strategy
9.1.5 Business analysis
9.1.6 Product development
9.1.7 Test marketing
9.1.8 Commercialization

9.2 Idea Management System Page 279
9.2.1 Appoint ideas manager
9.2.2 Create a cross-functional idea management committee
9.2.3 Set-up a toll-free number
9.2.4 Send ideas to idea manager
9.2.5 Set-up formal recognition programs
 

9.3 Marketing Strategy Development Page 283
9.3.1 Idea screening
9.3.2 Concept development and testing
9.3.3 Marketing strategy
9.3.4 Business analysis
9.3.5 Product development
9.3.6 Test marketing
9.3.7 Commercialization

Chapter 10 Three Different Process Models Identified

10.1 Internal Factors Affecting Pricing Decisions Page 309
10.1.1 Internal: Marketing objectives
10.1.2 Marketing mix strategy
10.1.3 Costs
10.1.4 Organizational decisions

10.2 External Factors Affecting Pricing Decisions Page 315
10.2.1 External: Nature of market and demand
10.2.2 Competitors costs, prices, and offers
10.2.3 Other external factors

10.3 General Pricing Approach Page 320
10.3.1 Selecting a general pricing approach

Chapter 11 Two Process Models Identified

11.1 Initiating Price Changes Page 345
11.1.1 Anticipate possible buyer and competitor reactions

11.2 Responding to Price Changes Page 347
11.2.1 Has competitor cut price
11.2.2 Will lower price negatively affect our market share and profits
11.2.3 Can/should action be taken

Chapter 12 Five Different Process Models Identified

12.1 Marketing Channel Perform Many Key Functions Page 364
12.1.1 Gathering and distributing marketing research
12.1.2 Develop and spread
12.1.3 Find and communicate
12.1.4 Shaping and fitting
12.1.5 Reaching an agreement
12.1.6 Transporting
12.1.7 Acquiring
12.1.8 Assuming

12.2 Channel Design Decisions Page 372
12.2.1 Analyzing consumer needs
12.2.2 Setting channel objectives
12.2.3 Identifying major channel alternatives
12.2.4 Evaluate

12.3 Channel Management Decisions Page 377
12.3.1 Channel alternatives
12.3.2 Best channel design
12.3.3 Implement and manage
12.3.4 Motivating individual channel members
12.3.5 Evaluate their performance

12.4 Nature and Importance of Marketing Logistics Page 379
12.4.1 Planning
12.4.2 Implementing
12.4.3 Controlling

12.5 Logistics Manager Page 380
12.5.1 Forecasting
12.5.2 Information systems
12.5.3 Purchasing

12.5.4 Production planning
12.5.5 Order processing
12.5.6 Inventory, warehouse, and transportation planning

Chapter 13 Three Process Models Identified

13.1 Retailer Marketing Decisions Page 402
13.1.1 Define their target market
13.1.2 Decide on how they will position
13.1.3 Decide on three major product variables
13.1.4 Price policy must fit its target market and positioning
13.1.5 Use any and all promotion tools
13.1.6 Select locations that are accessible to targeted markets

13.2 Wheel of Retailing Page 409
13.2.1 Challenge established retailers
13.2.2 Costs increase
13.2.3 New retailers become like the conventional
13.2.4 The cycle begins again

13.3 Wholesaler Marketing Decisions Page 417
13.3.1 Define target market
13.3.2 Position themselves effectively
13.3.3 Decided on product assortment and services, price, promotion, and place

Chapter 14 Four Different Process Models Identified

14.1 A View of the Communication Process Page 431
14.1.1 Sender
14.1.2 Encoding
14.1.3 Message
14.1.4 Media
14.1.5 Decoding
14.1.6 Receiver
14.1.7 Response
14.1.8 Feedback
14.1.9 Noise

14.2 Steps in Developing Effective Communication 432
14.2.1 Identify target audience
14.2.2 Determine the communication objectives
14.2.3 Designing a message
14.2.4 Selecting the message source
14.2.5 Collecting feedback
14.2.6 Choosing media

14.3 Setting the Total Promotion Budget and Mix Page 440
14.3.1 Setting the total promotion budget
14.3.2 Setting the overall communication mix

14.4 Integrating the Promotion Mix Page 444
14.4.1 Analyze trends
14.4.2 Audit the pockets of communications spending
14.4.3 Identify all contact points
14.4.4 Team up in communications planning
14.4.5 Create compatible themes
14.4.6 Create performance measures
14.4.7 Appoint a director

Chapter 15 Two Different Process Models Identified

15.1 Developing an Advertising Program Page 455
15.1.1 Setting advertising objectives
15.1.2 Setting the advertising budget
15.1.3 Develop advertising strategy
15.1.4 Evaluating advertising campaign

15.2.1 Selecting Advertising Media Page 463
15.2.2 Deciding on reach, frequency, and impact
15.2.3 Choosing among major media types
15.2.4 Selecting specific media vehicles
15.2.5 Deciding on media timing

Chapter 16 Four Different Process Models Identified

16.1 Major Steps in Sales Force Management Page 489
16.1.1 Designing sales force strategy and structure
16.1.2 Recruiting and selecting salespeople
16.1.3 Training salespeople
16.1.4 Compensating salespeople
16.1.5 Supervising sales people
16.1.6 Evaluating sales people

16.2 Recruiting and Selecting Sales People Page 494
16.2.1 Analysis the sales job
16.2.2 Identifying the traits needed
16.2.3 Recruit the right salespeople

16.3 Sales Force Automation Systems Page 498
16.3.1 Analyze and forecast sales
16.3.2 Manage account relationships
16.3.3 Schedule Sales Calls
16.3.4 Make presentations
16.3.5 Enter orders
16.3.6 Check inventories and order status
16.3.7 Prepare sales and expense Reports
16.3.8 Process correspondence

16.4 Major Steps Effective Selling Page 501
16.4.1 Prospecting and quality
16.4.2 Preapproach
16.4.3 Approach
16.4.4 Presentation and demonstration
16.4.5 Handling objections
16.4.6 Closing
16.4.7 Follow-up

Chapter 17 Two Different Process Models Identified

17.1 Competitor Analysis Page 527
17.1.1 Identify competitors
17.1.2 Assessing competitors objectives, strategies, S & W, and reaction patterns
17.1.3 Select which competitor to attack and avoid

17.2 Strategies for Market Leaders, Challengers, Followers, and Nichers Page 539
17.2.1 Marketing leader strategies
17.2.1.1 Expand total market
17.2.1.2 Protect market share
17.2.1.3 Expand market share
17.2.2 Market challenge strategies
17.2.2.1 Full frontal attack
17.2.2.2 Indirect attack
17.2.3 Market follower strategy
17.2.3.1 Follow closely
17.2.3.2 Follow at a distance
17.2.4 Market Nicher strategies
17.2.4.1 By customer
17.2.4.2 Market
17.2.4.3 Quality-price
17.2.4.4 Service
17.2.4.5 Multiple niching

Chapter 18 One Process Model Identified

18.1 Setting Up an E-Marketing Presence Page 567
18.1.1 Creating a web site
18.1.2 Placing ads online
18.1.3 Setting up or participating web communities
18.1.4 Using e-mail

Chapter 19 One Process Model Identified

19.1 Major Decisions in International Marketing Page 590
19.1.1 Looking at global marketing environment
19.1.2 Deciding whether to go international
19.1.3 Deciding which markets to enter
19.1.4 Deciding how to enter the market
19.1.5 Deciding on the global marketing program
19.1.6 Deciding on the global marketing organization

Chapter 20 One Process Model Identified

20.1 Societal marketing Page 642
20.1.1 Considering consumers wants
20.1.2 The companys requirements
20.1.3 Consumers long run interests
20.1.4 Society long run interests

TEXTBOOK TWO ASSESSED

Lamb, Hair, McDaniel 8 ed 2006, South-Western
(Back to TOP)


57 Process Models Identified or Stated in 690 Textbook Pages and 38 Internet Pages

Chapter 1 Two Process Models Identified

1.1 Relationship Marketing Page 12
1.1.1 Developing a Clear Understanding of Who your Customers Are
1.1.2 What they Value
1.1.3 What they Buy
1.1.4 Preferred Interaction
1.1.5 Served by You

1.2 Differences Between Sales and Marketing Orientation Page 17
1.2.1 What is Organizations Focus
1.2.2 What Business are You In
1.2.3 To Whom is the Product Directed
1.2.4 What is your primary Goal
1.2.5 How do You Seek to Advance Your Goal

Chapter 2 Three Different Process Models Identified, Four Stated But Not Identified

2 What is a Marketing Plan Page 39
2.1 Business Mission Statement
2.1.2 Objectives
2.1.3 Situation or SWOT Analysis
2.1.4 Marketing Strategy
2.1.5 Target market strategy
2.1.6 Marketing Mix
2.1.7 Implementation, Evaluation, Control

2.2 Strategic Alternatives Page 48
2.2.1 Increase Market share
2.2.2 Attracting New Customers
2.2.3 Creation of New Products
2.3.4 Introducing New Products into New Markets

2.3 Target Market Strategy Page 50
2.3.1 Identifies the Market Segment or Segments
2.3.2 Focus
2.3.3 Marketing Opportunity Analysis
2.3.4 Selecting Target Markets

2.4 Product Strategies Page 52 No Strategy Discussed

2.5 Place Distribution Strategies Page 52 No Strategy Discussed

2.6 Promotion Strategies Page 52 No Strategies Discussed

2.7 Pricing Strategies Page 53 No Strategies Discussed

Chapter 3 No Process Models Identified

Chapter 4 One Process Model Identified

4.1 Global Marketing Mix Page 128 See Chapter 8
4.1.1 However Global Marketing Research is Conducted in Vastly Different Environments

Chapter 5 Three Different Process Models Identified

5.1 Consumer Decision-Making Process Page 153
5.1.1 Need Recognition
5.1.2 Information Search
5.1.3 Evaluation of Alternatives
5.1.4 Purchase
5.1.5 Post Purchase Behavior

5.2 Analyze the Components of the Consumer Decision Model Page 157
5.2.1 Need Recognition
5.2.2 Information Search
5.2.3 Evaluation Alternatives
5.2.4 Purchase

5.3 Continuum of Consumer Buying Decision Page 159
5.3.1 Involvement
5.3.2 Routine Response Behavior
5.3.3 Limited Decision Making
5.3.4 Extensive Decision Making

Chapter 6 No Process Models Identified

Chapter 7 Four Different Process Models Identified

7.1 Segment Markets for Three Important Reasons Page 225
7.1.1 Identify Groups with Similar Needs
7.1.2 Analyze the Characteristics and Buying Behavior
7.1.3 Design Marketing Mixes
7.1.4 Meeting Customer Needs
7.1.5 Meeting Organizational Objectives

7.2 Steps in Segmenting a Market Page 238
7.2.1 Select a market or a Product Category
7.2.2 Choose a Basis or Bases for Segmenting
7.2.3 Select Segmentation Descriptors
7.2.3 Profile and Analyze Segments
7.2.4 Select Target Markets
7.2.5 Select Target Markets
7.2.6 Design Implement and Maintain Appropriate Marketing Mixes

7.3 Strategies for Selecting Target Markets Page 239
7.3.1 Designs
7.3.2 Implements
7.3.3 Maintains
7.3.4 Exchange

7.4 Positioning Page 249
7.4.1 Assessing the Positions Occupied by Competing Products
7.4.2 Determining the Important Dimensions Underlying These Positions

Chapter 8 Eight Different Process Models Identified

8.1 Marketing Research Page 263
8.1.1 Planning
8.1.2 Collecting
8.1.3 Analyzing Data

8.2 Improving the Quality of Decision Making Page 263
8.2.1 Idea Generation
8.2.2 Sessions Conducted
8.2.3 First Phase Consumer Testing
8.2.4 Second Phase Consumer Testing
8.2.5 Reaction of the First Phase
8.2.6 Tried Product Prototypes
8.2.7 Rank Displays

8.3 Marketing Decision Making Page 266
8.3.1 Improve Quality Decision Making
8.3.2 Trace Problems
8.3.3 Focus on Keeping Existing Customers
8.3.4 Understanding Changes in the Marketplace

8.4 Steps in Marketing Research Process Page 267
8.4.1 Identify and Formulate the Problem
8.4.2 Plan Research Design and Gather Primary Data
8.4.4 Specify the Sampling Procedures
8.4.5 Collect Data
8.4.6 Analyze the Data
8.4.7 Prepare and Present Report
8.4.8 Follow up

8.5 Research Design Page 270
8.5.1 Specify which Research Questions
8.5.2 How Data Will be Gathered
8.5.3 When Data Will be Gathered
8.5.4 How Data Will be Analyzed

8.6 Executive Interview Page 273
8.6.1 Locate Qualified Person
8.6.2 Agree to be Interviewed
8.6.3 Set Time for Interview
8.6.4 Go to Interview

8.7 Specifying the Sampling Procedures Page 277
8.7.1 Population or Universe of Interest Defined
8.7.2 Sample Representative
8.7.3 Select Probability or Non-probability Sample

8.8. Steps Involved in Conducting Marketing Research Page 281
8.8.1 Identify Problem
8.8.2 Plan Research Design
8.8.4 Select Sampling Procedures
8.8.5 Collect Data
8.8.6 Analyze Data
8.8.7 Prepare and Present the Report
8.8.8 Follow up

Chapter 9 No Process Models Identified

Chapter 10 Three Different Process Models

Identified10.1 New Product Development Process Page 336
10.1.1 New Product Strategy
10.1.2 Idea Generation
10.1.3 Idea Screening
10.1.3 Business Analysis
10.1.4 Development
10.1.5 Test Marketing
10.1.6 Commercialization
10.1.7 New Product

10.2 Diffusion of Innovation Page 346
10.2.1 Innovators
10.2.2 Early Adopters
10.2.3 Early Majority
10.2.4 Late Majority
10.2.5 Laggards

10.3 Product Life Cycle Page 348
10.3.1 Introductory Stage
10.3.2 Growth Stage
10.3.3 Maturity Stage
10.3.4 Decline Stage

Chapter 11 Seven Different Process Models Identified

11.1 Marketing Process Described in Chapter 1 Page 362
Cannot find
11.2 Product (Service) Strategy Page 367
11.2.1 Types of Processes Involved
11.2.2 Core and Supplementary Services
11.2.3 Standardization or Customization of Service Product
11.2.4 Service Mix

11.3 Place Distribution Strategy Page 369
11.3.1 Number of Outlets to Use or Open
11.3.2 Distribute Directly or Indirectly
11.3.3 Location of Service

11.4 Promotion Strategy Page 370
Not a strategy

11.5 Price Strategy Page 370
11.5.1 Define the Unit of Service Consumption
11.5.2 Bundled or Separate
11.5.3 Set Performance Objectives

11.6 What is Nonprofit Organization Marketing Page 376
11.6.1 Identify the Customers
11.6.2 Specify Objectives
11.6.3 Develop Manage and Eliminate
11.6.4 Decide on Prices to Charge
11.6.5 Schedule Events
11.6.6 Communicate Availability

11.7 Unique Aspects of Nonprofit Organization Marketing Strategies Page 376
11.7.1 Setting of Marketing Objectives
11.7.2 Selection of Target Markets
11.7.3 Development of Appropriate Marketing Mix

Chapter 12 One Process Model Identified

12.1 Materials Handling System Page 417
12.1.1 Receiving goods
12.1.2 Identifying, Sorting and Labeling
12.1.3 Dispatching
12.1.4 Recalling

Chapter 13 One Process Model Identified

13.1 Retail Marketing Strategy Page 453
13.1.1 Defining and Selecting a Target Market
13.1.2 Develop the Retailing Mix
13.1.3 Meet Needs of Chosen Target Market

Chapter 14 Four Different Process Models Identified

14.1 Role of Promotion in the Marketing Mix Page 480
14.1.1 Overall Marketing Objectives
14.1.2 Marketing Mix
14.1.3 Coordinated plan
14.1.4 Convince Target Customers

14.2 Communication Process Page 486
14.2.1 Sender
14.2.2 Encoding the Message
14.2.3 Message Channel
14.2.4 Decoding Message
14.2.5 Receiver

14.3 AIDA Concept Page 491
14.3.1 Attention
14.3.2 Interest
14.3.3 Desire
14.3.4 Action

14.4 Product Life Cycle Page 495
14.4.1 Introduction
14.4.2 Growth
14.4.3 Maturity
14.4.4 Decline

Chapter 15 Four Different Process Models Identified

15.1 Creative Decisions in Advertising Page 515
15.1.1 Objectives Identifies the Specific Communication Task
15.1.2 Specific Advertising Campaign During Specific Period of Time
15.1.3 Depends on Overall Corporate Objectives

15.2 DAGMAR Page 516
15.2.1 Precisely Define all Advertising Objectives
15.2.2 Work on Advertising Campaign
15.2.3 Follow the AIDA model
15.2.4 Identifying Creative Decisions
15.2.4 Developing and Evaluating Advertising Appeals
15.2.5 Executing the Message
15.2.6 Evaluate the Effectiveness of the Campaign

15.3 Creative Decisions in Developing an Advertising Campaign Page 521
15.3.1 Set Advertising Objectives
15.3.2 Identifying the Benefits
15.3.3 Develop Appeal
15.3.4 Execute the Message
15.3.5 Evaluate Campaign Results

15.4 Public Relations Page 530
15.4.1 Evaluates Public Attitudes
15.4.2 Identifies Issues
15.4.3 Executes Programs

Chapter 16 Five Different Process Models Identified

16.1 Objectives of Sales Promotion Page 544
16.1.1 Understand the Dynamics
16.1.2 Determine the Particular Consumers and Consumer Behavior
16.1.3 Selecting Promotional Tools
16.1.4 Achieve Goals

16.2 Relationship Selling Page 555
16.2.1 Identifying Prospects
16.2.2 Developing them as Long-Term Satisfied Customers
16.2.3 Mutually Beneficial Partnerships

16.3 Steps in the Selling Process Page 556
16.3.1 Generate Leads
16.3.2 Qualifying Leads
16.3.3 Approaching and Probing Customer
16.3.4 Developing and Proposing Solutions
16.3.5 Handling Objections
16.3.6 Closing the Sale
16.3.7 Following Up

16.4 Sales Management Page 564
16.4.1 Defining Sales Goals
16.4.2 Determining Sales Force Structure
16.4.3 Recruiting and Training
16.4.4 Compensating and Motivating
16.4.5 Evaluating

16.5 Functions of Sales Management Page 570
16.5.1 Set Sales Goals
16.5.2 Create Sales Force Structure
16.5.3 Recruit and Train
16.5.4 Compensate and Motivate
16.5.5 Evaluate

Chapter 17 One Process Model Identified

17.1 Stages of the Product Life Cycle Page 603
17.1.1 Introduction Stage
17.1.2 Growth Stage
17.1.3 Maturity Stage
17.1.4 Decline Stage

Chapter 18 One Process Model Identified

18.1 How to Set a Price on a Product Page 620
18.1.1 Establish Pricing Goals
18.1.2 Estimate Demand, Costs, and Profits
18.1.3 Choose a Pricing Strategy
18.1.4 Fine-Tune the Basic Price

Chapter 19 No Process Model Identified
Chapter 19 was Found on the Internet

Chapter 20 Two Different Process Models Identified

20.1 Customer Relationship Management System Page 661
20.1.1 Identify Customer Relationships
20.1.2 Understanding Interactions with Current Customer Base
20.1.3 Capture Customer Data Based on Interactions
20.1.4 Store and Integrate Customer Data
20.1.5 Identify Best Customers
20.1.6 Leverage Customer Information

20.2 Marketing Database Applications Page 675
20.2.1 Campaign Management
20.2. 2 Retain Loyal Customers
20.2.3 Cross-selling of Products and Services
20.2.4 Designing Targeted Market Communications
20.2.5 Reinforcing Customer Purchase Decisions
20.2.6 Inducing Product Trail
20.2.7 Increasing Effectiveness of Distribution
20.2.8 Improving Customer Service

Marketing textbooks are set up for students to fail. Process or method is combined with information or content. The current marketing textbook story of how this combining takes place and prevents any learning.

CONTENT IV
IMPOSSIBLE TEST BANK QUESTION

I HAVE BEEN A MARKETING PROFESSOR FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS. I HAVE PROBABLY TAUGHT PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING OVER 100 TIMES. I GOT THE NERVE TO TAKE THE TEXTBOOK MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST FOR PHILIP KOTLER'S MARKETING TEXT. WHEN I TOOK THE TEST I PUT DOWN ANSWERS THAT I BELIEVED TO BE TRUE. I DID NOT LOOK AT THE TEXTBOOK ANSWERS. I FAILED THE TEST BY ANY STANDARD. I THEN HAD THE PERSONAL STRENGTH TO ADMIT MY FAILURE AND TO ALSO BELIEVE THAT IT WAS NOT MY FAILURE. THIS WOULD MEAN THAT A PERSON THAT GOT AN 'A' HAD JUST MEMORIZED USELESS INFORMATION TAUGHT AS MARKETING. ANY PROFESSOR THAT COULD ALSO PASS THE TEST HAD JUST MEMORIZED WORTHLESS MATERIAL. I WOULD SPECULATE THAT PHILIP KOTLER COULD ALSO NOT PASS THE TEST. TRY AND TAKE IT PHIL? YOU WILL THEN SEE THE HARM DONE IN YOUR NAME.

Professor take thy own test. I got all these questions wrong according to the textbook answer chart. Each story must have its testing to assure that those who do well are rewarded.

Dear Fellow Marketing Professors:

I have been a professor in the field of marketing for twenty years. I finally decided that I would have a chance to pass the textbook provided test for the first chapter of Kotler and Armstrong Marketing 11th Edition. I have taught this course more than eighty times.
I bravely took the test and got 50% wrong. With this number of mistakes I would probably receive an F in your course. May I request that you please take the test and let me know how many answers you get correct according to the answer key. I think these are the ones I got wrong.

1. Marketing seeks to create and manage profitable customer relationships by delivering _____ to customers.
a. competitive prices
b. superior value
c. superior service
d. superior promotion
e. product assortment

2. You have learned at work that todays successful companies at all levels have one thing in common: they are strongly customer focused and heavily committed to _____.
f. obtaining the best CEOs
g. increasing wealth to stockholders
h. marketing
i. employee motivation
j. social responsibility

3. _____ is managing profitable customer relationships.
k. Management
l. Control
m. Marketing
n. Human resources
o. Customer service

4. The twofold goal of marketing is to attract new customers by promising superior value and to _____.
p. keep and grow current customers by delivering satisfaction
q. keep and grow current customers by delivering competitive pricing
r. keep and grow current customers by delivering friendly service
s. keep and grow current customers by delivering vast product assortment
t. all of the above

5. Highly successful companies know that if they take care of their customers, _____ will follow.
u. frequent word of mouth
v. market share
w. profits
x. sales and profits
y. increased competition

6. What do companies call a set of benefits that they promise to consumers to satisfy their needs?
z. marketing offer
aa. value proposition
bb. demand satisfaction
cc. need proposition
dd. evoked set

7. You are preparing a combination of products, services, information, and experiences to a market to satisfy needs and wants. What are you preparing?
a. value proposition
b. demand satisfaction
c. tactical plan
d. marketing offer
e. strategy

8. We must learn a valuable lesson in marketing. Many sellers make the mistake of paying more attention to the specific products they offer than to the _____ produced by those products.
a. benefits
b. experiences
c. benefits and experiences
d. value satisfaction
e. customer loyalty

9. Smart marketers look beyond the attributes of the products and services they sell. They create brand _____ for consumers.
f. awareness
g. recognition
h. preferences
i. experiences
j. loyalty

10. The difference between customer value and customer satisfaction is that value is the difference between the values the customer gains from owning and using a product and the _____.
k. cost of delivery of the product
l. cost of obtaining the product
m. cost of competing products
n. cost of the lost experience
o. all of the above

11. At work, customers decide to satisfy needs and wants through exchange. What occurs at this point?
p. selling
q. customer service
r. marketing
s. transaction pricing
t. satisfaction

12. Marketing consists of actions taken to build and maintain desirable _____ with target audiences involving a product, service, idea, or other object.
u. exchange transactions
v. exchange relationships
w. exchange processes
x. exchange privileges
y. exchange communication

13. Marketing is not carried on by sellers alone. _____ also carry on marketing.
z. Suppliers
a. Investors
b. Web designers
c. Buyers
d. All of the above

14. _____ means managing markets to bring about profitable exchange relationships by creating value and satisfying needs and wants.
e. Selling
f. Promoting
g. Marketing
h. Relationship marketing
i. Market segmentation

15. Marketing managers are concerned with ways to deal with demand. They may need to find, increase, _____, or even _____ demand.
j. avoid; slow
k. change; reduce
l. maximize; change
m. change; modify
n. maintain; ignore

16. We have learned by sad experience that the product concept can lead to marketing _____.
o. failures
p. myopia
q. problems
r. incongruence
s. malfeasance

17. Most firms practice the selling concept when they face _____.
t. a crisis
u. a recession
v. fierce competition
w. overcapacity
x. marketing myopia

18. One of the following is the call of the Information Age where the customer asks:
y. "This is what I want. Will you make it safer?"
z. "This is what I want. Wont you please make it?"
a. "Can you make it safer and sell it cheaper?"
b. "This is what I want. Can you provide more options?"
c. "This is what I want. Can you show me how to make it?"

19. Customer-driven marketing usually works well when _____ and when customers _____.
d. a clear need exists; are easy to identify
e. customers know what they want; can afford it
f. a firm can deliver the goods desired; are thoroughly researched
g. a clear need exists; know what they want
h. a want exists; cannot afford it

20. Now many companies are beginning to think of _____ interests as well as their own customers needs.
i. societys
j. stockholders
k. investors
l. lenders
m. competitors

21. The societal marketing concept seeks to establish a balance between consumer short-run wants and consumer _____.
n. short-run costs and profits
o. short-run ethics
p. long-run welfare
q. health
r. value propositions

22. Companies today face some new marketing realities that mean there are fewer customers to go around. Changing demographics, ____, and overcapacity in many industries are great concerns.
s. more sophisticated competitors
t. higher unemployment
u. slowing incomes
v. increased technology
w. 9/11

23. Experience has taught us that the key to building lasting customer relationships is to create superior customer value and _____.
x. satisfaction
y. great service
z. competitive prices
a. long-term relationships
b. short-term relationships

24. Customers buy from stores and firms that offer the highest _____.
c. value for the dollar
d. customer perceived value
e. level of customer satisfaction
f. both B and C
g. company image

25. Because customers tend to act on perceived values, they often do not judge product values and costs _____.
h. reliably
i. accurately
j. objectively
k. accurately or objectively
l. often

26. Beyond simply retaining good customers, marketers want to constantly increase their "share of customer." Describe what this means in marketing terms.
m. Marketers want to increase their market share.
n. Marketers want to increase the share they get of the customers purchasing in their product categories.
o. Marketers want to increase the profit margin with this target market.
p. Marketers want to continuously increase their customers levels of satisfaction.
q. None of the above

27. _____ is one of the best ways to increase share of customer.
r. Selling up
s. Using bait and switch
t. Cross selling
u. Relationship selling
v. Partnership marketing

28. Is the following statement true? Clearly, the more loyal the firms customers, the higher the firms customer equity.
w. no
x. yes
y. maybe
z. cannot tell accurately
a. only if the value proposition is understood

29. Surveys show that in markets with few customers and high margins, sellers want to create _____ with key customers.
b. basic relationships
c. relationship marketing
d. extreme partnerships
e. full partnerships
f. marketing myopia

30. Many organizations today realize that in addition to providing financial benefits to customers, they must also add _____ benefits.
g. social
h. emotional
i. rational
j. psychographic
k. product-use

31. By supplying customers with special equipment or computer linkages that help them manage their orders, payroll, or inventory, a business marketer would be building customer relationships by adding _____.
l. greater customer service
m. partnership marketing
n. structural ties
o. value-added services
p. none of the above

32. You will learn that marketing ultimately involves attracting, keeping, and _____ profitable customers.
q. tracking
r. placing in a database
s. growing
t. satisfying
u. none of the above

33. We can say that the major force behind the new "connectedness" is explosive advances in information, transportation, and _____.
v. computer telecommunications
w. improved market research
x. better-trained marketing departments
y. websites
z. customervendor relations

34. A tremendous advantage of modern communication and advertising tools is that marketers can zero in on selected customers with carefully _____.
a. selected customer profiles
b. standardized products
c. flexible pricing ranges
d. identified behaviors
e. selected targeted messages

35. A recent study confirms that Internet penetration in the United States has reached about what percent?
f. 40 percent
g. 50 percent
h. 60 percent
i. 70 percent
j. 80 percent

36. Many marketers use a concept today to determine which customers can be served profitably and which ones cannot. They target the winning ones for pampering. What is this concept called?
k. selective relationship management
l. target marketing
m. market segmenting
n. selective targeting
o. partnership marketing

37. There is a trend today to do away with unprofitable customers. This ends up improving the _____ of the firm.
p. database
q. profitability
r. image
s. customer relationships
t. market share

38. In addition to connecting more deeply with customers, many companies are also connecting more _____.
u. directly
v. frequently
w. inexpensively
x. efficiently
y. none of the above

39. Today, in countries around the world, managers are going beyond a local view of the companys industry and competitors. _____ opportunities are becoming more common.
z. Global
a. Ethnic
b. Sub cultural
c. Internal
d. Domestic

40. Governmental agencies are becoming more involved in marketing as the years pass. When a local government advertises keeping the areas streams and water supply cleaner, it is involved in _____.
e. green marketing
f. social marketing campaigns
g. demarketing
h. environmental marketing
i. partnership marketing

41. Is it true that every type of organization can connect through marketing?
j. yes
k. no
l. maybe
m. only for-profit entities
n. cannot be determined

42. Many not-for-profit organizations are facing huge operating deficits that they must cover by more aggressive _____.
o. volunteer service
p. customer service
q. advertising
r. donor marketing
s. social marketing campaigns

43. The old marketing view emphasized trying to make a profit on each sale rather than trying to profit by managing what value?
t. customer equity
u. customer satisfaction index
v. cognitive dissonance
w. brand equity
x. all of the above

44. Modern companies are improving their customer knowledge and customer _____.
y. appreciation
z. awareness
a. relationships
b. loyalty
c. none of the above

45. Through making a marketing offer, marketers understand _____.
d. consumer needs and wants
e. product benefits
f. competitors actions
g. the global marketplace
h. marketing myopia

46. The selling concept takes a(n) _____ perspective; the marketing concept takes a(n) _____ perspective.
i. inside-out; outside-in
j. outside-in; inside-out
k. customer-driven; inside-out
l. inside-out; customer-driven
m. outside-in; outside-in

1996 - 2008
3/22/08




"Education encourages adolescent greed in children and adults."
DM